Don’t make starting a new job harder than it needs to be.

We all know how stressful starting a new job can be. It’s difficult to find your bearings with your work assignments and trying to fit in with a new company’s culture. But, there are a few common pitfalls that we can help you avoid when it comes to taking on a new position.

Mistake: Not asking questions.

Part of being the “new guy” is needing to ask questions and figure things out. There are two reasons that people don’t ask questions 1) they’re afraid to ask or 2) they go ahead and assume they know the answer. If you’re afraid to ask, don’t be! Whenever a new person comes into the office everyone expects them to have questions and need some help, it comes with the territory. Other times, people don’t ask questions because they assume it will be like the last job they had. Instead, try to check most of your assumptions at the door on your first day. Bottom line: asking questions will prevent costly mistakes. It’s also a great way to show that you’re committed to learning and professional development.

Mistake: Isolating yourself from co-workers.

We can all start feeling shy whenever we are the new person, but it’s important to push through it and get to know your co-workers. When it comes to that first week at work, go find some people to eat lunch with! When you’re first starting, take any opportunity you can to socialize with your co-workers. It will make your job more fun. Plus, your co-workers are more likely to help you out if they know you.

Mistake: Arriving late.

You might think to come in five minutes after 9:00 a.m. isn’t a big deal, but you’re wrong. It gives off a poor impression and puts you behind, even if just by a few minutes. Instead, consider getting to work 15 minutes early and plan on having some coffee and a quick chat with co-workers. You’ll feel oriented and ready to start if you get there just a few minutes early.

Mistake: Not setting boundaries.

Just because you’re the new person, doesn’t mean you shouldn’t set expectations and boundaries. Be wary of working lunches and staying late. You don’t want to set yourself up for burn-out. The same rules apply when it comes to taking on work assignments; don’t agree to more than you can handle. That’s just setting yourself up to fail.

Mistake: Not writing things down.

Even if you have the best memory in the world, there’s no way you’ll survive your first few weeks without a notepad by your side. Just write down everything. You can sort it out later. It will help you later on whenever the training and orientations end and you actually have to get on-the-job. You won’t regret anything that you write down, only what you didn’t.

Take on your new job with confidence and excitement, and you’re bound to thrive.

 

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